Our Ancestors

Alabama

Benjamin Franklin Berryhill - 4th AL Cavalry - Color Sgt Randy Arrick

Pvt. Alpheus Porter enlisted in Waddell's Alabama artillery. The battery was raised in Russell Country Alabama in February of 1862. It was formed by taking 20 men from each company of the 6th Alabama Infantry. The battery was assigned to Tracy's Brigade and sent to the Army of Tennessee in time to participate in General Braxton Bragg's Kentucky campaign (including the battles of Perryville and Richmond). In November of 1862 the battery is consolidated in a newly formed Alabama Brigade under the command of General Stephen D. Lee. It consisted of the 20th, 23rd, 30th, 31st, and 46th Alabama Infantry regiments as well as Waddell's battery and fought in the Vicksburg campaign against forces under Grant. The battery saw action at Port Gibson and Champion Hill. At Champion Hill the men were commended for bravery against the overwhelming enemy force which forced them to retreat back to Vicksburg having lost all its guns. It was refitted with guns including 12-pound howitzers and 20-pound parrot rifles. The battery was divided at Vicksburg with one gun being placed at the railroad redoubt, one at the 3rd Louisiana Redan, and two at Fort Garrott. On May 22 Waddell's battery in Fort Garrott helped repulse a Federal attack. During the siege the men were reduced by sharpshooters and Federal artillery which knocked out two of the guns. The battery was surrendered on July 4, 1863 after 48 days of siege. After being exchanged Waddell's battery was increased to battalion strength and designated the 20th Alabama Light Artillery Battalion, having three batteries. The battalion was then sent to the AOT and saw action during the Atlanta campaign under General John Bell Hood. These battles included Rocky Face Ridge, New Hope Church, Kennesaw Mountain, Peachtree Creek, and Atlanta. The 20th AL artillery was later sent to the North Carolina Department as part of Pettus' Brigade in Bragg's army. After the war he moved to Denton, Texas and is buried in Chinn Chapel Cemetery in Copper Canyon, Tx. Alpheus Porter is the Great-Great-Great Grandfather of Luke Bradford.

Pvt. Andrew J. Watson - 10th Alabama Infantry Regiment, Company I - Rank in: Private, Last held rank: Private.  I have a copy of the "Receipt Roll" for the Bounty for enlistment in the service of the Confederate States. And I have a copy of the "Register" of the Claims of deceased Officers & Soldiers from Alabama which were filed for settlement in the Office of the Confederate States Auditor of the War Department.  Andrew J. Watson served in the 10th Alabama Infantry Regiment, Company I. He was present at the siege of Yorktown (April 1862). The 10th Alabama Infantry Regiment was part of Wilcox's Brigade (which included the 9th, 10th, 11th Alabama Infantry, & the 19th Mississippi Infantry. Commanded by Brigadier General Cadmus M. Wilcox.  Andrew J. Watson was reported sick at Williamsburg on May 5th, 1862. He enlisted under the Act of December 11, 1861 and he died at Richmond, Virginia in May, 1862 He was born in Alabama; his noted occupation was a farmer; his residence was Bennettsville, Alabama; he was 30 years old and he was married.   The 10th Alabama Infantry Regiment was organized at Montgomery, June 4, 1861, and went to Virginia a month later. When it arrived at Winchester it was brigaded under Gen. E. K. Smith, with the Ninth and Eleventh Alabama, Nineteenth Mississippi, and Thirty-eighth Virginia. It saw no active service for several months, and lay near Manassas and Centerville, with Gen. Wilcox in command of the brigade. It was doing some detached duty when attacked at Drainsville, where it lost 21 killed and 64 wounded. The regiment marched to the peninsula, and was shelled at Yorktown during the siege. - Pvt. William Nola, Co. G

 

Arkansas

William R. Hasley 29th (37th) Arkansas, Company F. William was from Clark County, Arkansas. He, along with his brother in law, my great great uncle, James H. McGinnis, enlisted in the 29th (37th) Arkansas, Company F, on May 7th, 1862. He was reported as sick at a hospital in Little Rock in June of 1862 at St. John's College Hospital. From a surgeon's report he had been shot through both thighs at a skirmish at St. Charles on the White River. After and during his convalescence he was detailed to Brigade Headquarters as a teamster, possible ambulance driver. He is reported as deserted on June 15th, 1863. Two members of Company F who were witnesses on his pension application state that he served until the end of the war. - Maternal great great grandfather of 1st Sgt Ron White, Company G

James H. McGinnis 29th (37th) Arkansas, Company F. (see William Hasley). At this point I do not have the service/pension record for James H. McGinnis. - Great great uncle of 1st Sgt Ron White, Company G

Pvt. Francis Asbury Wisener - Enlisted in Company F, 6th Arkansas Cavalry, in Clark county, Arkansas, March 1, 1863; transferred to Co. H, 37th Arkansas Infantry, April 5, 1863; captured at Helena, Arkansas, July 4, 1863; confined at U.S. Military Prison, Alton, Illinois, where he died on April 28, 1864; born in Alabama in 1829; listed in Clark county 1860 census with wife Lucinda; occupation farmer.  I have copies of two muster rolls. The first dated June 3, 1862 to April 30, 1863. Which noted when he enlisted, what county, a 3 year enlistment & that he received no pay. And the second muster roll dated May & June 1863, noting when he enlisted, what county, 3 year enlistment, & under remarks he transferred to another command April 5th, 1863. I also have copies of the USA Post & Prison Hospital records of Alton, Ill. Noting when & where he was captured ( July 4th, 1863 - Helena, Ark) Received in hospital Oct 17, 1863 - returned to quarters on Dec 25, 1863.  Received in hospital Jan 12, 1864 - discharged (returned to quarters) on Jan 22, 1864.  Received in hospital March 10, 1864 - Died April 28, 1864. "Disease, Diagnosed with Pneumonia" - Pvt. William Nola, Co. G

 

Georgia

2nd Sgt. Henry Snow - Company K, 42 Regiment Georgia Infantry - Volunteered for service in the Confederate Army and enlisted on March 4, 1862 at Atlanta, GA. for a period of 3 years or during the War. The 42nd Georgia Infantry was organized at Athens, Georgia, during early 1862. Members of this regiment were from Gwinnett, Milton, Dekalb, Newton, Walton, and Fulton counties and were mustered into Confederate service in April 1862. Shortly after entering service it was assigned to duty in the Department of East Tennessee. It served there until December 1862 and was then transferred to Vicksburg serving in the Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana and in the Army of Vicksburg. After the fall of Vicksburg, the regiment served in the Army of Tennessee except for a brief period in 1865 when it served in the Department of Alabama, Mississippi, and East Louisiana. Extensive research has been done. For the full story, click here. - 3rd great-uncle of Pvt. Glenn Rutz, Co. I

 

Indiana


Pvt. Abraham Richards, 32nd Indiana Infantry - Involved in Bleeding Kansas before the war as a strong abolitionist. Abraham returned to his home state of Indiana and was mustered into service with the 32nd Indiana Infantry on 8/24/61. Saw action at Shiloh, Corinth, Stones River, Chickamauga, Siege of Chattanooga, and several battles in the Atlanta Campaign. After the fall of Atlanta, the 32nd was consolidated into a four company battalion due to losses. They were ordered to Chattanooga, and remained there on garrison duty until June of 1865. They were then sent to Texas via New Orleans, and were part of the occupation force in San Antonio until they were mustered out on 12/4/65.  Abraham was with the 32nd throughout all of this, and returned south to the Indian Territory as a minister. He is believed to be buried in the vicinity of Kingfisher, Oklahoma.. - Submitted by Sgt. Gary Richards.

 

Kansas


Sgt. Charles A. Spenner - Co. F, 6 Kansas Cavalry - Glenn Rutz

 

Mississippi

Pvt. Hezekiah N. Hastings Co. F, 7th Miss. Cavalry Regt., which later formed up with the 1st Miss Cav. (Partisan Rangers). His name appears on a register of POW's at Fayette Co. Tenn., April 24, 1865. His name also appears on oath of allegiance to USA sworn to in Memphis Tenn., from April 15 to May 1, 1865. - Dan Hastings

Pvt. Benjamin Franklin Hastings - Co. E, 19th Mississippi Infantry. Mustered in at Oxford, Mississippi. Wounded at Richmond on April 2, 1861. Wounded again on June 27, 1862. Shown to be at hospital in Richmond in October 1864. Presumed dead or not heard from since December 1864. - Dan Hastings

Pvt. Thomas Jefferson Hastings - Co. E., 19th Mississippi Infantry. Discharged Sept. 1, 1861, after 8 weeks due to chronic rheumatism. Returned home to Jackson Mississippi. Archives show a T. J. Hasting enlisting with the 7th Miss. Cav., Co F. late in the war. Theory is that in searching for his brother, Ben, he ran across his father, Hezekiah, and enlisted with him. He dropped the "s" off his last name and served for the duration. - Dan Hastings

Benjamin Cobb Germany - 36th MS Infantry Co. D - Color Sgt Randy Arrick

Willis P Germany - 8th MS Infantry kia Peachtree Creek - Great Uncle of Color Sgt Randy Arrick

Thomas Burris Thomasson - 17th MS Infantry Co. E - Color Sgt Randy Arrick 

 

Missouri

Emile Peron Colin - Battery G, 1st Missouri Light Artillery (Hesock's Battery) Pea Ridge, Perryville, Stone's River/Murfreesboro (served as a cannoneer in the battery that halted the advance of the Ninth Texas Infantry on the first day), Chickamauga (severely wounded in hand-to-hand fighting during the battery's stand at Dyer's Farm to cover the retreat of Sheridan's Division), Siege of Chattanooga, Missionary Ridge, Atlanta Campaign. Mustered out for wounds and disability after the Fall of Atlanta. - Great-grandfather of Jim Mogan, Great-Great Grandfather of Michael Mogan. 

 

Ohio

Pvt. Joseph Modlin served in the 8th Regiment, Company G, Ohio Volunteer Cavalry (reorganized from the 44th OVI) in the Civil War. He was ranked a private. He entered the service on Feb. 23, 1864 for three years, was believed captured at Beverly, West Virginia on Jan 11, 1865, but had escaped and returned the following day (obtained from the Letters of John A. McKee, "To See the Elephant"). He mustered out with his company on July 30, 1865. He may have been listed on the roll as Joseph "Moldin" and the roster at the Ohio Historical Society in Columbus, Ohio had Modlin spelled Maudlin. He is buried at the National Cemetery in Marion, Indiana. Great-great grandfather of Roger Modlin and great-great-great grandfather of Cole Modlin.

Pvt. Flavious J. Pitsenbarger - Co. E, 40 Ohio Volunteer Infantry - Glenn Rutz

 

South Carolina

3rd Sgt. Robert Thompson Chamblee - Capt. John R. Miot's Co., Aiken's Reg't, Partisan Rangers. (Alias: 6th Reg't South Carolina Cavalry). Survived. - great great great grandfather of James Coker

Pvt. Josiah (Joseph) Coker - Pvt. Co. E, 20th South Carolina Infantry. Wounded at Cold Harbor. Furloughed but never made it home. - Great great great grandfather of James Coker.

 

Tennessee

Sgt. F.T. Simmons, Co. K, 4th Tn. Inf. Mustered into service as a private with the 4th Tennessee Infantry at Germantown, TN on May 15, 1861. Fought at Shiloh, Munfordville KY, Perryville, and Murfreesboro. After Murfreesboro, the 4th was
consolidated with the 5th TN. due to losses. The combined regiment was reorganized, and Simmons was assigned as a Sergeant in Co. K. Served with the 4th/5th through Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, and the Atlanta Campaign. Wounded around Atlanta, and given a furlough to return home.  This was impossible due to the fact that his home was now deep behind enemy lines. Returned to his regiment to take part in Hood's '64 Tennessee Campaign. The 4th/5th, serving under Gen. Strahl, was known to have planted their colors on the last line of Federal breastworks at Franklin. Sgt. Simmons survived Franklin, and was with the 4th/5th when they served as part of the rear guard as the A.O.T. retreated from Nashville. Simmons regiment was consolidated again with eight other Tennessee regiments to form the 3rd TN. Consolidated Infantry. What remained of the 4th/5th, was now Co. D of this regiment. Sgt. Simmons served with the A.O.T. through it's final campaign in the Carolinas and was paroled on May 1, 1865 in Greensboro, N.C. - Submitted by Sgt. Gary Richards.

 

Texas

Pvt. John T. Asbury - 30th Texas Cavalry (1st Texas Partisan Rangers), Co A. Battles: Honey Springs - July 17, 1863 (I have Reference The 30th Fought in this battle but, other references makes no mention of Honey Springs); Camden Expedition - March to May 1864; Poison Spring - April 18,1864; Massard's Prairie - (close to Fort Smith) July 27, 1864; Fort Gibson - September 16,1864; and Cabin Creek - September 19, 1864 - (POW) - Great Great Great Grand Father Of Cpl. Matthew Campbell Co G.

Pvt. Jesse James Asbury - 15th Texas Infantry Co I. Battles: Stirlings Plantation - 09/29/1863; Teche Campaign - 10/3 to 11/30/1863; Bayou Bourbeau - 11/3/1863; Red River Campaign - March to May 1864; Camden Expedition - March to May 1864 - (POW) 

Pvt. Thomas J Barton - Co. B, 3rd Reg't Texas Cavalry. Survived. - Great Great Great Grandfather of James Coker.

Pvt. Alvah Devotie Boggs - In 1861, when the Confederacy was organizing it's army in Texas, Alvah enlisted in Nichol's regiment at the age of 17 and served for six months on Galveston Island. Re-enlisting for the war in Waul's Legion in March 1862, he went East of the Mississippi river where he served with that command until it's capture at Vicksburg. During the siege he was acting Sergeant Major of the First Battalion of the Legion and was paroled after the capitulation. Returning home to Leon County, at the age of 18, Alvah married Miss Sarah Ann Eliza Traweek, 16 years of age, on August 12, 1862. He remained home until he was exchanged, after which he rejoined his command at Houston, Texas. The command was then organized into a regiment under the command of Colonel Bernard Timmons. Alvah entered the medical department where he served until the end of the War. The command broke up at Galveston, Texas, May, 1865. While in the Army, Alvah read medicine under Dr. T. B. Grayson, of Freestone County, Texas. Great Great Grandfather of Pvt. Brian Larsen

Pvt. Thomas James Booker - Walkers Texas Division, kia, Mansfield, La. - Great Great Grandfather of Gary Booker

Pvt. William Bradford enlisted in the 29th Texas Cavalry on July 8, 1862 in Denton County, Texas. The 29th, led by Col. Charles DeMorse, served in Indian Territory and Arkansas, operating against the invading Union forces of Frederick Steele. It served in General Cooper's cavalry brigade, 1st Corps, Trans-Mississippi Department. The 29th fought in the battles of Honey Springs, Camden, Munn's Mill, Poison Springs, Massard's Prairie, Fort Gibson, and Cabin Creek. It surrendered, with the rest of the Trans-Mississippi department on May 26, 1865. After the war William was friends with Sam Bass, a Denton County outlaw, and shot and killed a man for beating up his son. He then fled to his boyhood home in Tennessee to avoid the law. He is buried in the Bradford Cemetery in Bradford, Tennessee ( both being named after his brother). William Bradford is the Great-Great-Great Grandfather of Luke Bradford.

Pvt. Noah T. Freeman - Co. B, 11th Texas Infantry Reg't, Walker's Texas Division. (alias: Walker's Greyhounds. Capt. James H. Jones' Co. B). Survived. - Great Great Great Grandfather of James Coker.
Sgt. Caleb Jackson Garrison - Co. K, 14th Texas Cavalry (dismounted), Ector's Brigade, The Army of the Tennessee. Served on Ector's Staff from 1863 until the end of the War. Was elected to 3 terms in the State House of Representatives from Rusk Co., and served two terms in the State Senate. - Great Grandfather (mothers grandfather) of Gary Booker

Pvt. William H. Graham - Co. D, 11th Texas Infantry Reg't, Walker's Texas Division (alias: Walker's Greyhounds). Survived. - Great Great Great Grandfather of James Coker

Pvt. William Hawk enlisted in the 3rd Texas Cavalry, AZ Brigade on February 21, 1863. The 3rd was commanded by Col. Madison and served in the cavalry brigades of Generals Major and Green, 1st Corps, Trans-Mississippi Department. The 3rd Cavalry Regiment, AZ Brigade was sent to General Richard Taylor's army in Louisiana and operated against the invading Union forces under General Nathaniel Banks, which were attempting to invade Louisiana and Northeast Texas for the purpose of getting cotton. The 3rd was in many battles with the enemy including those of the Red River Campaign. He fought at Plaquemine, Brashear City, two battles taking place at Donaldsonville, Cox's Plantation, Stirling's Plantation, Bayou Bourbeau, Wilson's Farm, Manfield, Pleasant Hill, Monnett's Ferry, Bayou Rapides, Wilson's Landing, Mansura, and Yellow Bayou. General Taylor's army successfully drove Banks' Federal army out of Louisiana while inflicting more casualties on the enemy than his army suffered. The 3rd Texas Cav., AZ Brigade disbanded in May of 1865 rather than surrendering. After the war, William joined the Denton County Sul Ross Camp #129, United Confederate Veterans. He is buried in Chinn Chapel Cemetery in Copper Canyon, Texas. William Hawk is the Great-Great-Great Grandfather of Luke Bradford.

Pvt. James Madison McNabb - Co. B, Texas 29th Texas Cavalry - Enlisted in Denton Co. 1961. Mustered out, Hempstead, Texas, 1965. Born February 21, 1841, Died 1927 St. Jo., Texas. Confederate States Army Assignments and Engagements: Cooper's Brigade, Roane's Division, 1st Corps, Army of the West, Trans-Mississippi Department (December 1862 - January 1863), Cooper's Brigade, Steele's Cavalry Division, District of Arkansas, Trans-Mississippi Department (January-October 1863), Battle at Fort Gibson (May 20, 1863), Battle near Honey Springs (July 17, 1863), Cooper's Brigade, Indian Territory, Trans-Mississippi Department (October 1863-February 1864), DeMorse's Brigade, Indian Territory, Trans-Mississippi Department (February 1864), Camden Expedition (March-May 1864), Gano's Brigade, Maxey's Cavalry Division, District of Arkansas, Trans-Mississippi Department (April 1864), Battle at Poison Spring (April 18, 1864), Camden (April 23, 1864), District of the Indian Territory, Trans-Mississippi District (July 1864), Massard's Prairie, near Fort Smith [detachment] (July 27, 1864), Gano's Brigade, Cooper's (Indian) Division, District of the Indian Territory, Trans-Mississippi Department (September 1864), Cabin Creek (September 19, 1864), Gano's Brigade, Cooper's (Indian) Division, Wharton's Cavalry Corps, Trans-Mississippi Department (September 1864-February 1865),1st (Waul's) Texas Infantry Brigade, 1st (Forney's) Texas Infantry Division, 1st Corps, Trans-Mississippi Department (February-May 1865) Great, Great, Great Grandfather of Mike Dawes Co I.

Pvt. John W. Story - 2nd Co. B, 35 (Brown's) TX Cavalry - John W. Story, a pioneer citizen of Milam county was born 27 May 1820, probably in Giles county Tennessee. John and his family migrated to Milam county about 1856 from Lauderdale co., Alabama. When the War Between the States broke out John heeded the call of his country and enlisted in Company I "Milam Guards," 27th Brigade, Texas State Troops and was elected Captain on 29 March 1862. On May 17, 1862 John, age 41, and son Richard, age 18, were mustered in as privates in 2nd Company B, 35th Texas (Brown's) Cavalry Regiment. Their enlistment was for three years or the duration of the war. The regiment spent its entire career within the state of Texas and was assigned to the Army of the Trans-Mississippi. John also reported as a blacksmith for the War Department from December 1862 to October 23, 1863. The 35th Texas Cavalry participated in two engagements during the war. The first was at Matagorda Peninsula, Texas on December 29, 1863. The second was at Indianola, Texas on February 22, 1864. Unofficial reports indicate that the regiment disbanded once the news of the collapse of the Confederacy reached Texas. John was sick most of the time that he served with this unit and was in fact hospitalized at C.S.A. General Hospital in Shreveport, LA in Sept. 1864. He rejoined at Camp Ford, Tyler, TX in November of the same year. John's illness contracted during the war was also the cause of his death (diarrhea) and he died February 10, 1870 in Milam County and is buried in the Rice cemetery. - Great-great-great Grandfather of Pvt. Glenn Rutz, Co I

Pvt. Richard D. Story - 2nd Co. B, 35 (Brown's) TX Cavalry - Richard , son of John W. and Elizabeth Smith Story was born 1844 in Lauderdale co., Alabama. Like his father, Richard was sick most of the time during the war. He applied for a Confederate pension in 1907 from Bell county Texas which was approved in March 1908. He died March 19, 1912 and is believed to be buried in an unknown cemetery in Bell county. 

Corporal William M. White - 17th Texas Infantry, Company E. William was born in Tennessee in the 1839 but came to Texas when he was 12. He joined the 17th Texas Infantry, Company E, at Camp Terry, Texas, in early 1862. The 17th was in Walker's Texas Division (Walker's Greyhounds). The 17th was in the 3rd Brigade with the 3rd Texas Inf., the 16th Texas Inf., the 19th Texas Inf., and the 16th Texas Cavalry (dismounted). Much of 1862 was spent in Arkansas where my grandfather took ill at Little Rock. He recovered and served with his regiment at actions in Louisiana at Lake Providence, Milliken's Bend, Young's Point, Richmond, LaFourche Crossing, Brashear City, Cox's Plantation, Donaldsonville, Bayou LaFourche, Harrisonburg, Fort Beauregard, Morgan Ferry, Atchafalaya River, Sterling's Plantation on Bayou Fordoche near Morganza, the campaign in Western Louisiana in the Teche Country, Opelousas, Barre Landing, Washington, Grand Coteau, Bayou Bourbeau, Carrion Crow Bayou, Buzzard's Prairie, Camp Pratt, and some of the operations against Bank's. Corporal White was captured at Fort DeRussy, La, on March 14, 1864. He was transferred to Baton Rouge, La, on March 17th and then on to New Orleans on March 20th, 1864. He was exchanged at Red River Landing on July 22nd, 1864. During this time the 17th was in almost continual fighting at Pleasant Hill and Mansfield in Louisiana. Then was sent North against Steele's Expedition in Arkansas. The unit was at Little Rock, Camden, Poison Springs, Marks Mills, Jenkin's Ferry, Saline River, and Tulip, Arkansas. Sometime during the middle of 1864 the 17th was ordered back to Shreveport and then later back to Hempstead, Texas. It appears that Corporal White may have been able to rejoin the 17th just as it was arriving at Shreveport. His application shows that he served until the end of the war. - Great Grandfather of 1st Sgt Ron White, Company G

Pvt. Asbery Wilson - 2nd Texas Infantry. Participated in the battle of Shiloh and was captured at Vicksburg, Miss. two weeks prior to the surrender while foraging for food. As he was not part of the general surrender he was denied parole and spent the remainder of the war as a p.o.w. in Camp Douglas, Ill. - Great Great Grandfather (father's mother's grandfather) of Gary Booker